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Total 3; currently 13.
Article8 September 2022
Annalisa Stacchini, Andrea Guizzardi and Michele Costa
The first objective of this study is to analyze visitors’ perceived value of four Italian small areas, that have been granted the European Regional Development Fund’s financing for developing sustainable tourism. The second objective of this ... Read More The first objective of this study is to analyze visitors’ perceived value of four Italian small areas, that have been granted the European Regional Development Fund’s financing for developing sustainable tourism. The second objective of this work is to investigate the influences of socio-demographic and trip-related characteristics on the tourists’ assessments of the main aspects of such destinations, for detecting variables useful for market segmentation and for designing better-targeted marketing actions. These areas host protected natural reserves, historical heritage, rural or mountain traditions, and ways of life, the conservation of which is combined with local economic growth through the development of green, cultural, and slow tourism. Thus, insights on how visitors’ perceived value is configured there might provide hints useful for upgrading the local tourism supply consistently with the United Nations’ Agenda 2030 for sustainable development and the European Green Deal Strategy. Results confirm that the perceived value is a fundamental construct, as it strongly and positively influences satisfaction, intention to recommend, and destination image. The value of sustainable destinations, as perceived by visitors, is mainly based on the affective benefits that sustainable experiences provide, starting from positive social interactions making tourists feel welcomed. The tourist segment valorizing sustainable destinations is mostly composed of old people and low-income travelers, who seek basic services and facilities, as their satisfaction depends mainly on relaxing immersed in pristine nature. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 3 (2022)pp. 202–223
Article17 May 2022
Alfred Söderberg
The market share of e-bikes has increased extensively in Europe over the last decade. How this trend will affect the transport system depends to a large extent on the substitution effect which needs to be determined ... Read More The market share of e-bikes has increased extensively in Europe over the last decade. How this trend will affect the transport system depends to a large extent on the substitution effect which needs to be determined in detail to allow projections on the potential of e-cycling as a means to promote sustainable transport systems. Further, little is known about what psychological determinants influence e-bike use, an important topic for policy makers that wish to promote e-cycling. This study aggregates GPS data from two randomised controlled trials in Sweden to determine the effect of e-bike use on travel behaviour. Motives behind e-bike use are investigated within a pathanalytic structural model, based on an expanded theory of planned behaviour. The results reveal that, on average, total cycling increased by 4.5 kilometres per person and day during the trials and its modal share measured in distance increased by 19%. E-bike use was predicted by the intention to bike to work, which in turn mediated the effects of attitudes and self-efficacy on e-cycling. Attitude mediated the indirect effect of personal norm on intention and collective efficacy amplified the effect of self-efficacy on intention. The results show that e-cycling has a large potential to contribute to a sustainable transport system. Policy makers could increase the use of e-bikes by strengthening individuals’ attitudes toward cycling and perceived self-efficacy to e-cycle, by making environmental personal norms more salient and by highlighting collective action in the effort to limit environmental degradation. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 2 (2022)pp. 88–104
Article28 March 2022
Reza Heydari, Mohammad Keshtidar, Haywantee Ramkissoon, Mahdi Esfahani and Ehsan Asadollahi
The aim of this study is to identify the adoption of entrepreneurial behaviours in sports tourism in developing countries. This research is a qualitative study. The systematic method of Strauss and Corbin has been used to ... Read More The aim of this study is to identify the adoption of entrepreneurial behaviours in sports tourism in developing countries. This research is a qualitative study. The systematic method of Strauss and Corbin has been used to analyse the data. Based on the results of in-depth interviews with stakeholders (n = 25), 75 indicators of sports tourism entrepreneurship were identified. Our research findings show that the necessary institutional arrangements in regulatory/legal/administrative dimensions (rule of law, government policies), normative/cultural (social norms, values, and beliefs), cognitive/educational (promotion of elite knowledge, promotion of social knowledge) and guidance measures/supporter (public sector support, private sector support, complementary attraction and information technology) have potential to improve the rate of entrepreneurial behaviours by increasing the ability and willingness of entrepreneurs to take advantage of entrepreneurial opportunities in the field of sports tourism. Our findings suggest that co-actors need to engage in a multi-stakeholder engagement approach to promote the tourism sports industry in developing countries. The existence of a legal, normative, supportive and educational environment may influence the ability and desire of market participants to identify and embrace entrepreneurial opportunities in the sports tourism sector. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 2 (2022)pp. 41–53
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