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Keyword: space tourism (orbital)
Total 12 articles
Article    13 February 2024
Piotr Gorzelanczyk and Henryk Tylicki
Highlights of Vehicles
Volume 2 (2024), Issue 1, pp. 1–12
596 Views149 Downloads
Article    11 November 2023
Sevasti Malisiova and Stella Kostopoulou
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 4, pp. 241–258
806 Views257 Downloads
Article    22 September 2023
Carlo Berizzi, Margherita Capotorto, Gaia Nerea Terlicher and Luca Trabattoni
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 4, pp. 185–206
1025 Views418 Downloads
Article    21 July 2023
Nikolaos Partarakis, Effrosini Karouzaki, Stavroula Ntoa, Anastasia Ntagianta, Emmanouil Zidianakis and Constantine Stephanidis
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 3, pp. 138–156
1172 Views362 Downloads
Article    14 June 2023
Małgorzata Polkowska
Space tourism is recreational space travel, whether by government vehicles, such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS), or by vehicles built by private companies. Since the flight of the world’s first space Space tourism is recreational space travel, whether by government vehicles, such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS), or by vehicles built by private companies. Since the flight of the world’s first space tourist, American businessman Dennis Tito (28 April 2001), space tourism (orbital) has been slowly growing. Orbital space tourism is very expensive, so a number of private companies have decided to concentrate on building much cheaper suborbital vehicles, designed to take passengers to altitudes of up to 100 km. On 4 October 2004, SpaceShipOne, funded by Virgin Galactic and designed by an American engineer, won the X Prize and, in doing so, ushered in a new era of commercial crewed spaceflight and space tourism. Since then, the design and construction of suborbital spacecraft have become increasingly popular. Such ships, in principle, do not have the ability to cross the imaginary 100 km boundary and enter the Cosmos area. However, space tourists can find themselves weightless for a few minutes. In fact, not only technical but legal difficulties have caused suborbital tourism to develop at a slow pace so far. This article concentrates on some legal challenges regarding space tourism, not going into details about states’ politics and international organizations’ activities. or Access Full Article
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 100–109
1173 Views567 Downloads
Article    18 May 2023
Larry Dwyer
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 83–99
1308 Views418 Downloads3 Citations
Review    8 May 2023
Annette Toivonen
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 75–82
1664 Views714 Downloads1 Citations
Article    13 April 2023
Thomas Krabokoukis
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 50–61
1546 Views436 Downloads3 Citations
Article    28 February 2023
Michele Sisto and Angela Cresta
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 1, pp. 16–34
1527 Views474 Downloads
Article    8 September 2022
Annalisa Stacchini, Andrea Guizzardi and Michele Costa
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 3, pp. 202–223
2834 Views904 Downloads1 Citations
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