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Journal: all
Keyword: development
Total 28 articles
Article    30 May 2024
Aristotelis Martinis, Maria Kaloutsa and Katerina Kabassi
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 255–274
153 Views56 Downloads
Article    10 May 2024
Henri Giudici, Kristin Falk, Gerrit Muller, Dag Eirik Helle and Erik Drilen
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 240–254
282 Views60 Downloads
Review    9 May 2024
Maria M. Ramirez-Corredores
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 205–239
354 Views68 Downloads
Article    2 May 2024
Michael Benson
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 184–204
295 Views75 Downloads
Article    28 April 2024
Hala Aburas
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 163–183
319 Views45 Downloads
Review    18 April 2024
Md Tasbirul Islam, Usha Iyer-Raniga and Amjad Ali
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 129–162
486 Views90 Downloads
Article    26 March 2024
Clint T. Lewis
Small Island Developing States have been identified as some of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change due to inherent environmental, economic, and demographic characteristics. The cross-cutting reach of climate change impacts has Small Island Developing States have been identified as some of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change due to inherent environmental, economic, and demographic characteristics. The cross-cutting reach of climate change impacts has led to the conversation of mainstreaming and its practicality. The study uses a qualitative research design that focuses on interviews with senior officials in the Caribbean at the national and regional levels. The study aims to identify the drivers of, barriers to adaptation mainstreaming into national policies and development plans in the Caribbean, and to derive actions needed to achieve mainstreaming at a national level. The main drivers of mainstreaming are the region’s vulnerability, institutional arrangement, and the government budget, while the major barriers include poor planning and governance, insufficient human resources, and competing development priorities. The paper proposes several key initiatives and actions needed at a national level that can help the region to achieve adaptation mainstreaming. To this end, mainstreaming adaptation at the national level is an essential strategy for building resilience to the impacts of climate change within the region. It cannot be a “one size fits all” approach but one that is tailored by countries to fit the countries’ circumstances and cultures. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 104–115
543 Views84 Downloads
Article    27 February 2024
Afonso Delgado, Paulo Caldas and Miguel Varela
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 1, pp. 84–103
613 Views141 Downloads
Article    13 February 2024
Piotr Gorzelanczyk and Henryk Tylicki
Highlights of Vehicles
Volume 2 (2024), Issue 1, pp. 1–12
596 Views149 Downloads
Article    29 January 2024
Manuel Rodeiro
Environmentalists have long claimed it is unjust for the state to prioritize economic interests over environmental ones by sacrificing ecosystem integrity and functioning to unsustainably expand the economy. Recently, mainstream environmentalists have moved to a more Environmentalists have long claimed it is unjust for the state to prioritize economic interests over environmental ones by sacrificing ecosystem integrity and functioning to unsustainably expand the economy. Recently, mainstream environmentalists have moved to a more conciliatory approach highlighting the common ground between environmental and economic goals. They today claim processes of economic growth and development can be made just if they become green. This paper explores the question: should states pursue “green growth”? Although some critics claim green growth is impossible, I maintain it is. I theorize three conditions that must be met for an instance of growth to be truly considered green. That a development project is green, however, does not automatically ensure it is just. Justice considerations remain in adjudicating the competing interests of different groups of stakeholders. I then examine four reasonable approaches to resolving controversies over the pursuit of green growth: cost-benefit analysis, sufficientarianism, democracy, and pluralism. I conclude a liberal pluralist form of decision-making is best for ensuring fairness. or Access Full Article
This article is part of the Special Issue Green Economic Growth and Energy Consumption.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 1, pp. 33–45
630 Views178 Downloads
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