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Keyword: agricultural practices
Total 7 articles
Article    6 October 2023
Felice Diekel, Vanessa Bach and Matthias Finkbeiner
This article is part of the Special Issue Capturing the Sustainable Impact of Early-Stage Business Models.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 4, pp. 207–223
1237 Views316 Downloads
Article    21 July 2023
Nikolaos Partarakis, Effrosini Karouzaki, Stavroula Ntoa, Anastasia Ntagianta, Emmanouil Zidianakis and Constantine Stephanidis
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 3, pp. 138–156
915 Views281 Downloads
Article    28 February 2023
Michele Sisto and Angela Cresta
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 1, pp. 16–34
1287 Views390 Downloads
Article    26 August 2022
Stephen K. Wegren
Although Russia’s grain growing regions have experienced episodic droughts, the financial impact of climate change has to date been modest when measured in terms of value of production lost. As industrial agriculture continues to emit greenhouse Although Russia’s grain growing regions have experienced episodic droughts, the financial impact of climate change has to date been modest when measured in terms of value of production lost. As industrial agriculture continues to emit greenhouse gases, the impact of climate change will intensify, making Russia’s southern regions drier and hotter, and potentially forcing a structural shift in production northward, an event that will lead to lower yields and grain output. The sustainable sector in Russia’s agricultural system is not able to compensate for lower grain output in the south, nor is it able to feed the nation or ensure food security across the full spectrum of commodities that consumers expect. The prospect of Russia as a declining grain power impacts the dozens of nations that import Russian grain, most notably authoritarian regimes in the Middle East. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 3, pp. 188–201
1495 Views690 Downloads2 Citations
Short Note    2 June 2022
James A. Dyer and Raymond L. Desjardins
The Carbon Footprint (CF) of agriculture must be substantially reduced to help avoid catastrophic climate change. This paper examines the ratio of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions to protein as an indicator of the CF of the The Carbon Footprint (CF) of agriculture must be substantially reduced to help avoid catastrophic climate change. This paper examines the ratio of Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions to protein as an indicator of the CF of the major Canadian livestock commodities using previously published results. The GHG emissions for these commodities were estimated with a spreadsheet model that accounted for all three GHGs, the complete life cycles of each livestock type and the livestock interactions with the agricultural land base. The indicator results reviewed here included the responses to livestock types and diets, livestock versus plant protein sources, spatial scales and geographic differences. The sensitivity of the results shown suggest that GHG-protein ratios could provide valuable guidance for producers and consumers to reduce their GHG emissions. For example, diverting feed grains from beef feedlots to hog production would substantially reduce the CF of red meat, although still not as low as the CF of poultry products. The complete proteins derived from pulses have much lower CF values than all livestock products. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 2, pp. 105–112
2022 Views535 Downloads
Article    6 May 2022
Marjan Marjanović, Wendy Wuyts, Julie Marin and Joanna Williams
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 2, pp. 65–87
2291 Views632 Downloads6 Citations
Short Note    20 September 2021
Chamila Roshani Perera and Lester W. Johnson
This paper argues that the strongly established connection between identity and consumer behaviour may not be necessarily applicable in examining environmentally conscious behaviour through an identity lens due to several other factors that may especially influence This paper argues that the strongly established connection between identity and consumer behaviour may not be necessarily applicable in examining environmentally conscious behaviour through an identity lens due to several other factors that may especially influence environmental identity formation; (1) the continuously evolving nature of environmental identity in the context of complexities (i.e., political debates, climate change science) of climate change; (2) the challenges of expressing inner connection with nature (i.e., instrumental value vs. intrinsic value); (3) the various cultural and symbolic meanings associated with environmentally conscious behaviour (i.e., functional benefits vs emotional benefits) and (4) different forms of behavioural practices (i.e., environmentally conscious behaviour vs. anti-consumption). Therefore, this paper recommends utilising insights and measurements unique to environmentally conscious behaviour as opposed to that of general consumer behaviour because the antecedents of the former, especially environmental identity projections can be multifaceted. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 1, pp. 1–4
1258 Views525 Downloads
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