Search Articles
Journal: all
Keyword: International Space Station (ISS)
Total 5 articles
Article    13 February 2024
Piotr Gorzelanczyk and Henryk Tylicki
Highlights of Vehicles
Volume 2 (2024), Issue 1, pp. 1–12
674 Views173 Downloads
Article    17 June 2023
Wan-Ju Chen, Rong-Ho Lin and Chun-Ling Chuang
This article is part of the Special Issue Capturing the Sustainable Impact of Early-Stage Business Models.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 110–137
1366 Views397 Downloads1 Citations
Article    14 June 2023
Małgorzata Polkowska
Space tourism is recreational space travel, whether by government vehicles, such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS), or by vehicles built by private companies. Since the flight of the world’s first space Space tourism is recreational space travel, whether by government vehicles, such as the Russian Soyuz and the International Space Station (ISS), or by vehicles built by private companies. Since the flight of the world’s first space tourist, American businessman Dennis Tito (28 April 2001), space tourism (orbital) has been slowly growing. Orbital space tourism is very expensive, so a number of private companies have decided to concentrate on building much cheaper suborbital vehicles, designed to take passengers to altitudes of up to 100 km. On 4 October 2004, SpaceShipOne, funded by Virgin Galactic and designed by an American engineer, won the X Prize and, in doing so, ushered in a new era of commercial crewed spaceflight and space tourism. Since then, the design and construction of suborbital spacecraft have become increasingly popular. Such ships, in principle, do not have the ability to cross the imaginary 100 km boundary and enter the Cosmos area. However, space tourists can find themselves weightless for a few minutes. In fact, not only technical but legal difficulties have caused suborbital tourism to develop at a slow pace so far. This article concentrates on some legal challenges regarding space tourism, not going into details about states’ politics and international organizations’ activities. or Access Full Article
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 100–109
1259 Views632 Downloads
Review    8 May 2023
Annette Toivonen
This article is part of the Special Issue Sustainable Tourism.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 75–82
1768 Views792 Downloads2 Citations
Article    2 May 2023
Floros Flouros
This article is part of the Special Issue Green Economic Growth and Energy Consumption.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 62–74
1240 Views424 Downloads
Article    2 May 2023
Floros Flouros
Sustainability and conditions that support a country to achieve its strategic goals are usually considered a critical priority for the international community. This paper examines the case of Greece, a country that was called upon to Sustainability and conditions that support a country to achieve its strategic goals are usually considered a critical priority for the international community. This paper examines the case of Greece, a country that was called upon to face successive crises during the last dec-ades which in almost all cases posed serious risks to the security of the country and its citizens. In crisis events that Greece faced lately, these were imported from abroad and they affected all levels of society: the global financial crisis that started in the US in 2008, the pandemic crisis that first appeared in China in late 2019, and finally the energy crisis that intensified from the beginning of 2020. Greece has tried to respond with internal balancing strategies at home with a series of measures and actions, while at the same time acting with external balancing strategies, as a member of the EU and the North Atlantic Alliance (NATO). The country has tried to deal with the successive crises having a positive result so far, but at a heavy price that has negatively affected the country’s development, often causing setbacks and delays in many areas of the economy, environment, and social life. As a result, the Greek economic crisis followed which affected all aspects of the social life in the country, making worse the economic parameters, affecting the relationship between the citizens and the state, and putting the normality of life into question. There are several studies published during the last years highlighting various aspects of the Greek economic crisis that provided specific answers regarding the main causes of the eruption of the Greek economic crisis as well as the proposals to deal with it. The purpose of this study is to highlight the impact of successive crises, which are due to both exogenous and endogenous factors, and that Greece has recently faced and identified the main effects on the Greek economy and its sustainability. The analysis adopts the time series of crises: economic, pandemic, and energy. or Access Full Article
This article is part of the Special Issue Green Economic Growth and Energy Consumption.
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 2 (2023), Issue 2, pp. 62–74
1240 Views424 Downloads
Subscribe to read the latest articles and newsletters from Highlights of Science.