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Keyword: resilience
Total 3 articles
Article    27 March 2024
Hannes Antonschmidt
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 116–128
196 Views42 Downloads
Article    26 March 2024
Clint T. Lewis
Small Island Developing States have been identified as some of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change due to inherent environmental, economic, and demographic characteristics. The cross-cutting reach of climate change impacts has Small Island Developing States have been identified as some of the most vulnerable countries to the impacts of climate change due to inherent environmental, economic, and demographic characteristics. The cross-cutting reach of climate change impacts has led to the conversation of mainstreaming and its practicality. The study uses a qualitative research design that focuses on interviews with senior officials in the Caribbean at the national and regional levels. The study aims to identify the drivers of, barriers to adaptation mainstreaming into national policies and development plans in the Caribbean, and to derive actions needed to achieve mainstreaming at a national level. The main drivers of mainstreaming are the region’s vulnerability, institutional arrangement, and the government budget, while the major barriers include poor planning and governance, insufficient human resources, and competing development priorities. The paper proposes several key initiatives and actions needed at a national level that can help the region to achieve adaptation mainstreaming. To this end, mainstreaming adaptation at the national level is an essential strategy for building resilience to the impacts of climate change within the region. It cannot be a “one size fits all” approach but one that is tailored by countries to fit the countries’ circumstances and cultures. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 3 (2024), Issue 2, pp. 104–115
197 Views40 Downloads
Article    6 December 2022
Julia Hillmann, Anne Bergmann and Edeltraud Guenther
This paper investigates the time-dependent effects of building organizational resilience. So far, empirical research only finds evidence that organizational resilience provides benefits in the long term. For the short and medium term, the link remains unclear This paper investigates the time-dependent effects of building organizational resilience. So far, empirical research only finds evidence that organizational resilience provides benefits in the long term. For the short and medium term, the link remains unclear. On the one hand, literature indicates that building organizational resilience is costly. On the other hand, actions to build organizational resilience are perceived by investors, which should provide immediate positive effects for companies. This study investigates these two assumptions in the climate change context. We apply multiple regression analysis to study the relationship between resilience capabilities and different measures of financial performance. For market value and financial volatility, our findings indicate that building organizational resilience provides immediate benefits. For the total stock return index, we find only benefits that materialize with a time lag. We find no evidence at all that building resilience capabilities is related to costs in terms of lower accounting-based financial performance. Overall findings indicate that building organizational resilience is advantageous as it prepares an organization to face the challenges of climate change and, at the same time, provides financial benefits. or Access Full Article
Highlights of Sustainability
Volume 1 (2022), Issue 4, pp. 233–252
1826 Views529 Downloads1 Citations
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