Special Issue: Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy
Deadline of submission 30 September 2022 (closed).
About this Special Issue
About this Special Issue
Global warming and resources scarcity have been still the main issues that have been addressed nowadays in both, economical and scientific conferences, and meetings. Therefore, industrial activities and engineering communities start a new era of energy-efficient uses. Conventional energy sources such as coal and natural gas are huge contributors to climate change. Reliance on conventional energy sources exposes consumers to price fluctuations and harms our health and environment. The world has witnessed a significant shift towards the use of renewable energy resources over the past couple of decades due to the reason of continuous depletion of fossil fuels. Renewable energy is the way to reliable and clean power. It gives significant advantages for the climate, health, and economy. Wind and solar energy need no water to operate and hence do not pollute water. In contrast, conventional sources can have a substantial impact on water resources. Energy efficiency is also essential to combat climate change. It is one of the easiest and most cost-effective ways to combat climate change. 

We cordially invite you to submit your original contributions to this Special Issue, entitled: "Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy". The present Special Issue aims to collect innovative solutions and experimental research supported by appropriate modeling and design, but also state-of-the-art studies, in the following topics: 

  • Energy efficiency
  • Renewable power generation systems, e.g., wind, solar, and wave
  • Next generation renewable energy technologies
  • Renewable energy for sustainable development
  • Distributed energy systems and microgrids
  • Bioenergy and Biomass
  • Energy from waste
  • Hydrogen and fuel cells
  • Energy storage techniques, e.g., batteries, supercapacitor
  • Real-time control and optimization of integrated renewable energy systems
  • Energy storage processes modelling and optimization
  • Renewable energy modelling
  • Analysis, design, and optimization methods for integrated energy systems
  • New concepts in renewable energy systems, e.g., energy route, energy hub, and energy internet, and energy big data
Special Issue Editor
Special Issue Editor
Hegazy Rezk
Hegazy Rezk
Electrical Engineering, College of Engineering - Wadi Aldwaser, Prince Sattam bin Abdulaziz University, Wadi Aldwaser, Saudi Arabia
Research Keywords: renewable and sustainable energy; energy management; energy efficiency; modern optimization; modeling based on artificial intelligence
Submission Information
Submission Information
All the manuscripts submitted to this Special Issue must be within both the scope of this Special Issue and the journal.
Manuscripts should be submitted online (Click here to submit, registration and login required). All the manuscripts will undergo a rigorous single-blind peer-review process.
Please prepare your manuscript following the Instructions for Authors, and make sure it is submitted in gramatically correct English.
Please refer to the Editorial Process and Article Processing Charge for more information about manuscript process and publishing fees.
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Published Papers
Published Papers
Review8 August 2022
Ambe J. Njoh, Ijang B. Ngyah-Etchutambe, Fri C. Soh-Agwetang, Pascar T. Tah, Mah O. Tarke and Fotoh J. Asah
Ensuring access to clean energy for all—Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #7—remains one of the most elusive SDGs in developing countries. This study reviews efforts to meet this goal in a developing community, namely Esaghem Village, Manyu ... Read More Ensuring access to clean energy for all—Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) #7—remains one of the most elusive SDGs in developing countries. This study reviews efforts to meet this goal in a developing community, namely Esaghem Village, Manyu Division in Cameroon. The efforts involved the use of a micro-off-grid solar PV system. The study employed primary data collected in-situ and from the project documents, and secondary data from electronic as well as conventional sources. The review is intended to highlight the impact of political, eco-nomic, social, technological, ecological, cultural and historical (PESTECH) factors on renew-able energy (RE) initiatives in a developing country. These are important but oft-ignored historio-cultural factors in the energy domain. The review reveals how one feature of indigenous African tradition, namely the self-help ethos can be harnessed to improve clean energy access in a developing country. It also showed how factors commonly associated with developing countries such as war, administrative centralization, bureaucratic corruption and ineptitude as well as poverty, thwart RE initiatives. The review underscores the importance of non-technical dimensions of RE projects and holds many lessons for the development, manage-ment and sustainability of such projects in developing countries writ large. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 3 (2022)pp. 159–170
Article11 July 2022
Peter Jean-Paul, Tek Tjing Lie, Timothy N. Anderson and Brice Vallès
Disaggregated data is often used to model the cost-benefit of residential energy management systems. However, obtaining such data is time-intensive and monetarily expensive. This hinders the depth of analysis that can be done on these systems ... Read More Disaggregated data is often used to model the cost-benefit of residential energy management systems. However, obtaining such data is time-intensive and monetarily expensive. This hinders the depth of analysis that can be done on these systems and negatively influences their large-scale uptake. This study proposes a novel generalised model of these systems that uses smart meter load profile data to model their cost-benefit. Using two years of half-hourly electricity consumption data from 5379 households in London, the model was used to examine how sociodemographic, tariff structures, and the choice of operational objectives of these systems, interact to influence their cost-benefit. The results showed that the proposed model produced reliable cost-benefit results within what is normally obtained in literature. The model demonstrated that applying one set of objectives to different customers leads to an inequitable distribution in benefits; rather, an optimal set of objectives for a given customer under a specific tariff structure can be found to produce a more equitable distribution in benefits across all customers. The proposed model is replicable and uses data that can be obtained easily and cheaply from smart meters, making it versatile for large-scale cost-benefit analysis by any electricity retailer. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 3 (2022)pp. 134–158
Review8 March 2022
Hwang Yi and Abhishek Mehrotra
Sustainable buildings tend to maximize power and information rather than efficiency. The multidimensional concepts and tools provided by systems ecology and thermodynamics aid the understanding of building performance and sustainability as part of the global and ... Read More Sustainable buildings tend to maximize power and information rather than efficiency. The multidimensional concepts and tools provided by systems ecology and thermodynamics aid the understanding of building performance and sustainability as part of the global and complex thermodynamic phenomena in living systems—energy is not concentrated, but it flows, increasing the flow rate of useful energy. From such an extended macroscopic perspective, this paper addresses holistic eco-systemic criteria of building performance evaluation, focusing on emergy (spelled with an “m”) and information—the two critical indices of extensive and intensive analysis. Emergy aggregates the utmost and upstream energetic impacts, whereas information evaluates the structural pattern of the energy-flow distribution. These indices are theoretically correlated under the principles of ecological energy transformation and are often practically compatible. To clarify the definitions and appropriate scientific contexts of the new indices for environmental building studies, we review information theory, ecological theorems, and a few pioneering studies. Emergy and information have a great potential for advanced environmental building analysis, but building-scale implementation of emergy, information, and system principles remains a scientific challenge. The findings call for further research into the improvement of building-specific emergy/information data and reliable evidence of the analogy between building and open living systems. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 1 (2022)pp. 12–40
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08028 Barcelona, Spain
Email: sustainability@hos.pub
Tel. +34 93 027 03 03
Cathy Wang
Managing Editor
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