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Total 16; currently 1116.
Article6 May 2022
Marjan Marjanović, Wendy Wuyts, Julie Marin and Joanna Williams
The notion of circularity has gained significant attention from governments of many cities across the world. The approaches to circular cities may range from narrower perspectives that see a circular city as the simple sum of ... Read More The notion of circularity has gained significant attention from governments of many cities across the world. The approaches to circular cities may range from narrower perspectives that see a circular city as the simple sum of circular economy initiatives to those more holistic that aim to integrate the whole urban system. Several researchers proposed frameworks that would guide cities to take a holistic perspective. This manuscript selects two frameworks and examines through them whether and to what extent broader and more holistic approaches to circular cities are being developed in practice. First, circularity principles, the scope of circular activities, and the concrete circular actions developed in the case study are read through Williams’s approach to circular resource management. Second, the spatial circularity drivers framework of Marin and De Meulder is used to elucidate different sustainability framings and spatial practices that dominate contemporary conceptualisations of circularity. These two lenses are applied to five municipalities in Alberta (Canada) that have decided to develop strategies for ‘shifting the paradigm’ and transitioning to circular cities in 2018. Our study aims to investigate how holistic their roadmaps to circular cities are, and what changes are necessary to move towards more integrated approaches. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 2 (2022)pp. 65–87
Article29 April 2022
Richard W. Butler and Rachel Dodds
Islands have long attracted tourists and some islands rank amongst the most visited places in the world. Such popularity has created problems of overdevelopment and tourism at unsustainable levels, leading to the phenomenon of overtourism. Traditionally ... Read More Islands have long attracted tourists and some islands rank amongst the most visited places in the world. Such popularity has created problems of overdevelopment and tourism at unsustainable levels, leading to the phenomenon of overtourism. Traditionally islands could rely on natural features to limit tourist numbers but this is increasingly not the case today, therefore, this paper reviews how changes in attitude, access and media coverage have led to problems of excessive visitation. The paper discusses the failure to create and implement appropriate policies which might mitigate against such developments and notes the inherent long-term problems many island authorities have traditionally faced when trying to improve economic conditions for their residents. The paper concludes that more specific action in terms of policy goals and implementation are needed if islands are to avoid the issues of unsustainable development and overtourism currently being experienced in many mainland tourist destinations. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 2 (2022)pp. 54–64
Article28 March 2022
Reza Heydari, Mohammad Keshtidar, Haywantee Ramkissoon, Mahdi Esfahani and Ehsan Asadollahi
The aim of this study is to identify the adoption of entrepreneurial behaviours in sports tourism in developing countries. This research is a qualitative study. The systematic method of Strauss and Corbin has been used to ... Read More The aim of this study is to identify the adoption of entrepreneurial behaviours in sports tourism in developing countries. This research is a qualitative study. The systematic method of Strauss and Corbin has been used to analyse the data. Based on the results of in-depth interviews with stakeholders (n = 25), 75 indicators of sports tourism entrepreneurship were identified. Our research findings show that the necessary institutional arrangements in regulatory/legal/administrative dimensions (rule of law, government policies), normative/cultural (social norms, values, and beliefs), cognitive/educational (promotion of elite knowledge, promotion of social knowledge) and guidance measures/supporter (public sector support, private sector support, complementary attraction and information technology) have potential to improve the rate of entrepreneurial behaviours by increasing the ability and willingness of entrepreneurs to take advantage of entrepreneurial opportunities in the field of sports tourism. Our findings suggest that co-actors need to engage in a multi-stakeholder engagement approach to promote the tourism sports industry in developing countries. The existence of a legal, normative, supportive and educational environment may influence the ability and desire of market participants to identify and embrace entrepreneurial opportunities in the sports tourism sector. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 2 (2022)pp. 41–53
Review8 March 2022
Hwang Yi and Abhishek Mehrotra
Sustainable buildings tend to maximize power and information rather than efficiency. The multidimensional concepts and tools provided by systems ecology and thermodynamics aid the understanding of building performance and sustainability as part of the global and ... Read More Sustainable buildings tend to maximize power and information rather than efficiency. The multidimensional concepts and tools provided by systems ecology and thermodynamics aid the understanding of building performance and sustainability as part of the global and complex thermodynamic phenomena in living systems—energy is not concentrated, but it flows, increasing the flow rate of useful energy. From such an extended macroscopic perspective, this paper addresses holistic eco-systemic criteria of building performance evaluation, focusing on emergy (spelled with an “m”) and information—the two critical indices of extensive and intensive analysis. Emergy aggregates the utmost and upstream energetic impacts, whereas information evaluates the structural pattern of the energy-flow distribution. These indices are theoretically correlated under the principles of ecological energy transformation and are often practically compatible. To clarify the definitions and appropriate scientific contexts of the new indices for environmental building studies, we review information theory, ecological theorems, and a few pioneering studies. Emergy and information have a great potential for advanced environmental building analysis, but building-scale implementation of emergy, information, and system principles remains a scientific challenge. The findings call for further research into the improvement of building-specific emergy/information data and reliable evidence of the analogy between building and open living systems. Access Full Article
This article is part of the Special Issue Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy.
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 1 (2022)pp. 12–40
Short Note16 February 2022
Massimo Biasin, Roy Cerqueti, Emanuela Giacomini, Nicoletta Marinelli, Anna Grazia Quaranta and Luca Riccetti
This paper explores a possible way in which strategic asset allocation decision-making processes can suitably exploit Social Impact Investments (SIIs). We focus on the role that SIIs play in the context of variance-minimizing investments. To this ... Read More This paper explores a possible way in which strategic asset allocation decision-making processes can suitably exploit Social Impact Investments (SIIs). We focus on the role that SIIs play in the context of variance-minimizing investments. To this aim, we employ an index that tracks companies’ financial performance. A hand-collected sample of Social Impact Firms (SIFs) is the basis of the empirical experiments. Our results point out that, on average, investors should invest a relevant fraction of their wealth in stocks of SIFs. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 1 (2022)pp. 5–11
Short Note20 September 2021
Chamila Roshani Perera and Lester W. Johnson
This paper argues that the strongly established connection between identity and consumer behaviour may not be necessarily applicable in examining environmentally conscious behaviour through an identity lens due to several other factors that may especially influence ... Read More This paper argues that the strongly established connection between identity and consumer behaviour may not be necessarily applicable in examining environmentally conscious behaviour through an identity lens due to several other factors that may especially influence environmental identity formation; (1) the continuously evolving nature of environmental identity in the context of complexities (i.e., political debates, climate change science) of climate change; (2) the challenges of expressing inner connection with nature (i.e., instrumental value vs. intrinsic value); (3) the various cultural and symbolic meanings associated with environmentally conscious behaviour (i.e., functional benefits vs emotional benefits) and (4) different forms of behavioural practices (i.e., environmentally conscious behaviour vs. anti-consumption). Therefore, this paper recommends utilising insights and measurements unique to environmentally conscious behaviour as opposed to that of general consumer behaviour because the antecedents of the former, especially environmental identity projections can be multifaceted. Access Full Article
Highlights of SustainabilityVolume 1, Issue 1 (2022)pp. 1–4
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